How to dress

When traveling to Egypt, please remember that you are in a Muslim country. Although Egypt is less strict compared to most other other Arabic countries you should think about how you are dressed, and this goes for both men and women! You should cover your upper arms and your leggs down to the knees at least. If you respect these rules and guidelines you will be met with the same respect from the Egyptians.

The Sun

The sun in Egypt is very strong all year around so it is not only a matter of respect, but also sensible to cover up a bit! Bring sunscreen, at least SPF25 and a hat or schal if you plan to spend most of your time out-doors.

Cold Winter Nights

During the winter months although the day temperature is nice and pleasant, don't be surprised if the nights get cold, sometimes below 0°C, so bring a warm sweater and a wind breaker to keep warm. If you plan on camping bring a sleepingbag.

Don't get sick

To avoid getting stomach problems wash your hands often! One of the biggest causes of stomach problems is the money. As soon as you have handled money, try to wash your hands. Having a alco-gel handy is recommended since it might be hard to find water to wash your hands in while traveling. Remember that the left hand is considered dirty while the right hand is clean and therefore used when eating. Never use your left hand for eating.

Money Matters

Generally most goods and services in Egypt seem to be very good value, but even so, there is a system of bargaining for everything you need, from hotel accommodation to taxis and souvenirs. Baksheesh (or tipping) is also a way of life - a kind of unofficial purchase tax on all goods and services and you will need to keep plenty of small denominations on you at all times. The level of baksheesh is entirely up to the individual and how much you value the service you have had. As a general rule a tip of EGP 1 to EGP 10 is usually acceptable for small sevices such as help with luggage or geting directions, while bigger tips are expected for more extensive services. This is a small amount for the tourist but is often a large portion of income for an Egyptian, whose monthly wage would not even cover our weekly food bill at home. They usually have large extended families to support on very little money.

Apart from these advice, use common sense and enjoy your trip. Most Egyptians are happy to see tourists in their country and will gladly offer to help you or even invite you into their homes.

Have a really nice trip to Egypt!


Go back to Egypt / Bawiti